How is Libertad, the song that Emilio Estefan composed in support of the demand for the end of the dictatorship in Cuba

How is Libertad, the song that Emilio Estefan composed in support of the demand for the end of the dictatorship in Cuba

After Homeland and life, the song that became the soundtrack of the protests that part of the Cuban people starred in demanding the end of the dictatorship that governs the island since 1959, the music continues to say its thing with the release of Liberty, a theme composed of producer Emilio Estefan.

The young Cuban artists Yailenys Pérez and Joncien interpret the song, whose video clip, which contains unpublished documentary images of the social reality of Cuba and through virtual reality places them in those places, he debuted on the YouTube channel of the Foundation for Human Rights in Cuba (FHRC).

That entity commissioned Estefan to write a song that spoke of the “suffering that Cubans have suffered” for more than six decades and at the same time “transmit a message of solidarity and hope,” according to FHCR executives and the producer.

A fusion of styles

Estefan wrote and produced a song that musically presents a fusion of rhythms that go from ballad to hip-hop, with a somewhat forced structure in order to meet those requirements and a lyrics that are not distinguished by a refined poetics, but rather It goes nonstop to spin.

“Cuba we are with you, those of here and those of there”, says the song, in which the collective of artists Movimiento San Isidro, to opponents such as Osvaldo Payá, Harold Cepero, Laura Pollán and Orlando Zapata, now deceased, and to political prisoners.

Joncien and Yailenys Pérez perform "Libertad", the song composed by Emilio Estefan.  Photo Video Capture

Joncien and Yailenys Pérez perform “Libertad”, the song composed by Emilio Estefan. Photo Video Capture

In the presentation to the press, the singer Yailenys Pérez said that “it is time for the gates of freedom to open in Cuba”.

Liberty arises “as a result of the international commotion generated by the strike carried out by members of the San Isidro Movement and human rights activists on the island in December 2020, “FHRC said in a statement.

That strike was “a fundamental element of the catalyst that generated the historic social outbreak of July 11 in much of Cuba,” he added. Estefan, husband of singer Gloria Estefan, worked for six months on the song and featured three cameras recording in Cuba.

The singer Yailenys Pérez joins the claim of those who call for the end of the dictatorship in Cuba.  Photo Video Capture

The singer Yailenys Pérez joins the claim of those who call for the end of the dictatorship in Cuba. Photo Video Capture

“I wanted them (the Cubans) to feel supported, that they are recognized and that in exile we are pending, but they have always been blocked. Let the whole world know what happened in Cuba“Estefan said to CNN.

A reflection of what happens in Cuba

For Tony Costa, president of the FHRC, this hymn “is a revelation of what the Cuban people are currently experiencing, who decided to shed the vestments of silence and took to the streets to demand that the oppressive regime respect their human rights.”

The video was directed by the Cuban director Magdiel Aspillaga, who told Radio Televisión Martí that the work “is a message of love to the Cuban people and also a way to show the world the pain that Cuba has been experiencing for more than 60 years. “

Joncien raps from a street in Havana thanks to technology and virtuality.  Photo Video Capture

Joncien raps from a street in Havana thanks to technology and virtuality. Photo Video Capture

“The Cubans ‘from here and there’ they are heard in a very emotional part of the song, so from the production point of view, we tried to get the interpreters to be located in Cuba, close to those who are there, “explained Aspillaga. That intention is crystallized in an edition that achieves its mission halfway.

Last February it was launched Homeland and life, a song created and performed by Yotuel Romero, Alexander Delgado and Randy Malcom, from the duo Gente de Zona, Descemer Bueno, El Osorbo and El Funky, which has become the “soundtrack” of the protests in Cuba, as the first of them.

Since then, various songs have emerged both for and against the communist regime that has held power on the island since 1959.

Source: EFE

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